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The Foxfire Book Series That Preserved Appalachian Foodways

Original story at NPR.org• 4 mentions • 1 month ago

NPR.org 1 month ago

 
The 1,500-mile Appalachian Mountain range stretches so far that those on the northern and southern sides can't agree on what to call it: Appa-LAY-chia or Appa-LATCH-ia. The outside perspective on the people who live there might be even more mangled. Stories about Appalachia tend to center around subjects like poverty, the opioid epidemic and coal, but since 1966 a series called Foxfire has been sharing food, culture and life as it's actually lived in the mountain region. Foxfire started as a class project at a Georgia high school — students interviewed neighbors and wrote a series of articles, which turned ...
 
 
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What they're saying:

18 Mar
Serpentine202 @Serpentine202
The Foxfire Book Series That Preserved Appalachian Foodways https://t.co/uLcICDa2is
18 Mar
melissa terry @melissaAterry
LOVE the #Foxfire series - thanks for this story, @NPR & @NPRFood! https://t.co/DnZfHSZUX4
18 Mar
Larry Ferlazzo @Larryferlazzo
The Foxfire Book Series That Preserved Appalachian Foodways https://t.co/50tbDJfSuT
17 Mar
NPRFood @NPRFood
The Foxfire Book Series That Preserved Appalachian Foodways https://t.co/I3gzGVDctM